A growing worldwide population and a speeding up economy is leading to the rising need for metals and minerals. Our future is mainly reliant on mining, the extraction of minerals from earth surface is connected to bigger social and environmental impact and danger for sustainability. In a series of 3 blog posts, we are going to look at tailings management from three angles. In this first piece of our blog series we concentrate on sustainability and social responsibility.

Taking on waste tailings

With recent failures in tailings dams, mining companies have attracted lot of international spotlight and higher levels of activism than ever before. Numerous lives have been lost in the past years as trailing dams have actually collapsed, damaging villages and infecting natural water bodies, leading to substantial liabilities and loss of investor worth.

Though mining market is taking positive steps to become more accountable towards local neighborhood welfare with optimal usage of natural resources, lots of considerable challenges stay. Visit mining supplies south africa for quality mining supplies and equipment.

Each mine is driven by either laws and regulations or out of their own offering responsibilities for sustainability and is continually searching for methods to conserve resources, minimize their ecological footprint and manage safety.

Mining includes processing of mined ore to separate important minerals leaving behind substantial volume of waste tailings. Water conservation and cost of tailings and improvement are also becoming progressively significant for sustainable and financially viable mining for long-lasting survival.

Reconsidering sustainable mining

Plainly, the mine operators need a practical and long-term solution to manage risk prone practices with a favorable worth production model. The future of mining depends upon sustainable mining practices that add to fair development of community and ecosystem while enabling contemporary life for human.

Leading the discussion on dry tailings and addressing decommissioning of tradition dams will incorporate conserving water and ore and reducing adverse effect on surrounding locations of a mine.

Saving Water – Today, about 70% of the mines run by the significant mining companies remain in nations where water scarcity is considered as the major threat. Therefore, responsible usage of water is the primary chauffeur for increasing interest in tailings dewatering. Mine operators should embrace clever filtering services that either help in optimizing water healing hence conserving water consumption in a mine or supply end to end service for dry stacking.

Saving Ore – The bigger goal is to clean-up existing tailings dams and re-process tailings which can supply much required mine back-fill material and reduce ore extraction from ROM. This would also help conserving ore, increasing mine life and reducing the volume of tailings to be kept.

Social Impact– Replacing damp trailing dams by dry stacking decreases the danger of social threats, conserving lives and home and maintaining natural water bodies by eliminating contamination and leaking. A more secure and more environmentally delicate tailings managing & management also minimizes conflicts with regional communities and regulative bodies.

Being socially responsible now is our only option

Efforts to reduce environmental impacts, secure local neighborhoods and enhance mining practices need to be undertaken throughout the mineral processing worth chain and life of a mine. As responsible business we must believe far and beyond with a structured vision for the future of our market. A vision that not only concentrates on an ecologically safe mining operation today however likewise, in long-lasting, looking for a viable end-of-mine technique.